Knowing Our Hearts

By Francis Frangipane
(En Español)

Our pursuit is not only to know the heart of God, but to know our own hearts in God's light. Indeed, as I draw closer to the heart of God, the very fire of His presence begins a deep purging work within me, and in the vastness of His riches, my poverty appears. The psalmist wrote, "Who may ascend into the hill of the Lord? And who may stand in His holy place? He who has clean hands and a pure heart, who has not lifted up his soul to falsehood, and has not sworn deceitfully" (Ps. 24:3-4).

We cannot even find the hill of the Lord, much less ascend it, if there is deceit in our heart. How does one serve in God's holy place if his soul is unclean? It is only the pure in heart who perceive God. To ascend toward God is to walk into a furnace of truth where falsehood is extracted from our souls. To abide in the holy place we must dwell in honesty, even when a lie might seem to save us. Each ascending step upon the hill of God is a thrusting of our souls into greater transparency, a more perfect view into the motives of our hearts.

In Preparation for God

By Francis Frangipane
(En Español)

The last, great move of the Holy Spirit will be distinguished by men and women who have been prepared by God for God.

We have given ourselves in prayer for revival; we have studied and discovered the Lord's heart for the lost. Without compromising the gospel's basic truths, grace has taught us to make Christ's message relative to our times and needs. For all our preparation, though, we have yet to prepare our hearts for God Himself.

We long to be sent by the Almighty for the sake of some great task – a miracle that turns a city to repentance or some significant act of service. However, the greatest task awaiting the church is not to be sent by God but to actually come to Him.

The Divine Obsession

By Francis Frangipane
(En Español)

There are three basic categories of Christians. The largest group consists of people who, though they try to avoid the darkness in the world, have no hope that the world can be redeemed. Assuming Christ's return is imminent, they retreat into what seems a shelter of apathy concerning the non-Christian world around them. Yet most are not truly apathetic. Their souls, like Lot's, are vexed by the conduct of unprincipled men (2 Pet. 2:7-8). Their compassion, though, is kindled even if it's limited. Rarely do they extend themselves beyond the needs of their immediate family and closest friends. They love the Lord, but they don't know how or what to do to change society or even to positively impact their neighborhoods.

Mercy Triumphs Over Judgment

By Francis Frangipane
(En Español)

Functional Christlikeness is the singular goal of God for the church, yet we find instead that many Christians are angry. Why shouldn't they be, they ask. Major strongholds of evil and oppression exist almost without restraint in our society today. Not only is evil expanding in our culture, but many of its forms are actually protected by a demonically invaded legal system.

Their anger is understandable. Whether we reside in a major metropolitan area or make our home in a small rural setting, the boundaries of morality in our country continue to erode. We have only to think about the protection given to those favoring abortion, the mainstreaming of homosexuality, or the applause offered to immorality, and a holy grieving stirs within us.