Repentance and the Way God Calls Holy

By Francis Frangipane
(En Español)

Many are calling for prayer for our nation. To that message I would like to add a call to repentance as well. Indeed, 2 Chronicles 7:14 not only calls us to pray but to follow through by humbling ourselves, aggressively turning away from evil. In that spirit, we then seek God's face. There is far too much compromise among us. We need a breakthrough into brokenness. A move of God is coming, but it will only be as deep as our repentance prepares us.

The purpose of this message is to take us beyond simply feeling sorry we sinned. God wants to bring us into an attitude of repentance that goes deep, that persistently turns to God's grace until the fruit of righteousness comes forth in our lives.

The Baptism of Repentance
The Bible tells us that prior to the beginning of Christ's ministry, "there came a man, sent from God, whose name was John" (John 1:6). John was sent by God to bring Israel into a baptism of repentance. This call to repentance was not the last event of the old covenant; it was the first event of the new covenant. John was the forerunner to Christ's ministry. His unique purpose was to immerse Israel in an attitude of repentance (Acts 19:4). Called to go before Christ, his task was to "prepare" and "make ready the way of the Lord" (Mark 1:2-3).

The Stone That the Builders Rejected

By Francis Frangipane
(En Español)

Becoming Wise Master Builders
Paul said, "Like a wise master builder I laid a foundation" (1 Cor. 3:10). The eternal foundation of the church is the Lord Jesus Christ; we rest and then build upon Him. It is wisdom to build the Lord's house with only Jesus in mind, as conformity to Him is our primary blueprint.

Jesus said, "The stone which the builders rejected, this became the chief cornerstone" (Luke 20:17). We cannot separate what Jesus says from who Jesus is. Christ and His Word are one. To the degree that we fail to obey and teach what Jesus taught, we are actually rejecting Him as Lord of the church.

United in Worship and War

By Francis Frangipane
(En Español)

One need not be a Bible scholar to recognize that Israel was called to be uncompromisingly united in their worship of God. Three times a year each tribe was required to come to Jerusalem to worship during the feasts. However, in addition to unity in worship, they also had to be united in warfare. Unless they ultimately faced the battle as "one man," their victory was rarely assured. (See Judges 6:16; 20:1, 8, 11; 1 Sam. 11:7; Ezra 3:1.)

Today we are still called to be united in our worship of the one true God and also to be united in our fight against sin and our spiritual enemies. There is an Old Testament story that reveals the heart we are seeking. The Israelites were in the land of Gilead about to cross the Jordan River (Num. 32). The tribes of Reuben and Gad, which had amassed much livestock, asked that their inheritance be given first, as the land on which they stood was suitable for grazing. Their request angered Moses, for he assumed they sought to divide from the nation in order to gain their individual inheritance.

Measure Those Who Worship

By Francis Frangipane
(En Español)

"Then there was given me a measuring rod like a staff; and someone said, ‘Get up and measure the temple of God and the altar, and those who worship in it. Leave out the court which is outside the temple and do not measure it, for it has been given to the nations'" (Rev. 11:1-2).

For whatever else this verse ultimately means, it tells us that the Spirit of God is measuring worshipers. He is studying those individuals whose treasure is in Heaven and who abide in the "inner court" of God's temple.

Consider: in our world of terrors, pressures and trauma, our only refuge exists in the living presence of God. We must not accept a religion about God and assume it is the same as living in the presence of God.

To This One Will I Look

By Francis Frangipane
(En Español)

Transcendent, Liberating Humility
Of all virtues, Jesus elevated meekness above the others. Why? Humility is the door opener to grace: no virtue enters our lives except that humility bids it come. Without humility, we have no sense or attachment to our personal need; we see no reason to change or appropriate future grace.

Yet, humility is not only host to the other virtues, it is also the life essence that sustains them. It is humility that recognizes when love is growing cold and humility that confesses our need for greater faith. Without humility, our virtues harden into lifeless statues within the sanctuary of our hearts. Thus, humility sustains the unfolding of true spiritual nobility. It provides increasing wholeness, life and growth to all other virtues.