Find God!

By Francis Frangipane
(En Español)

There is only one thing that keeps some churches from prospering spiritually. They have yet to find God.
Holiness Comes from Seeking the Glory of God
Jesus warned, "How can you believe, when you receive glory from one another, and you do not seek the glory that is from the one and only God?" (John 5:44). If we are displaying our spirituality to impress men, still seeking honor from others, still living to appear righteous or special or "anointed" before people, can we honestly say we have been walking near to the living God? We know we are relating correctly to God when our hunger for His glory causes us to forsake the praise of men.

Does not all glory fade in the light of His glory? Even as Jesus challenged the genuineness of the Pharisees' faith, so He challenges us: "How can you believe, when you receive glory from one another?"

The Three Battlegrounds

By Francis Frangipane
(En Español)

Introduction
I wrote The Three Battlegrounds to provide clear and balanced insight into the nature of spiritual warfare. Before we proceed, however, I have two concerns. The first is our need for wisdom. There is an old European proverb worth heeding. It reads: "Age and treachery will always defeat youth and zeal." Before we engage in spiritual warfare, we should know this about Satan: he is an ancient and extremely treacherous foe. On the other hand, the strength of most Christians lies primarily in idealism and untested fervor. It is not long, usually five to ten years in the ministry, and most zeal has waned. Without warning the minister’s call has deteriorated from a walk of vision to a mere job.

The Staff of God

By Francis Frangipane
(En Español)

This is an important message concerning ministry staff and what God can do with a group of yielded Christ followers. 

Imagine a church or ministry staff where each person's primary vision was to attain the likeness of Christ. Picture working with this group of people: not only do they each fulfill their responsibilities but they are earnestly reaching for Christ's humility in their service. When they see something flawed in another member of the team, they do not become accusers. Rather, they approach the situation with Christ's redemptive heart, praying for the situation first and, when necessary, bringing correction motivated by love.

Can you envision a staff that is committed to possessing unoffendable unity in their relationships? Is there any doubt that with such a team God could change the world?

An Unguarded Heart

By Francis Frangipane
(En Español)

The idea that a leader whom we've known and loved should suddenly be exposed in a devastating scandal seems incomprehensible. Certainly leaders who have taught others could teach themselves. Is there not resident within all Christians biblical knowledge that would protect us from moral failure?

So what is it then that can worm into an individual's thought-life, burrow down into his heart, and then grow so compelling that a leader is willing to risk everything he's loved and attained for a fulfillment of the flesh? Is it just sin? Or is there something deeper, a lack of spiritual discernment that left the heart of that leader vulnerable to demonic manipulation? Could it be that, at least among some, their heart was unguarded to the exploitation of hell?

What Are You Becoming?

By Francis Frangipane
(En Español)

It is insightful to me that when Luke listed the twelve apostles, when he came to Judas Iscariot, he identified him as the apostle "who became a traitor" (Luke 6:16).

Let me start with a question, a sincere question that may be the most important question you can ask yourself: What are you becoming? Judas Iscariot was an apostle "who became a traitor." This was a man who had been used mightily by the Lord to "heal the sick, raise the dead, cleanse the lepers [and] cast out demons" (Matt. 10:8). Judas knew the excitement, joy and power of personally walking with Jesus. He saw miracles, signs and wonders.

“Come and See”

By Francis Frangipane
(En Español)

John and Andrew began their spiritual commitment to God's will as disciples of John the Baptist. In fact, they had actually been standing near the prophet when Jesus walked by. As the Baptizer saw Jesus, he cried out, "Behold, the Lamb of God!" and from that moment the two disciples began to follow Jesus (John 1:35-37).

This was an insightful account. It is John's handwritten testimony of how he came to the Son of God. Yet John has deeper truths to reveal beyond this historic portrayal. He is also going to reveal what we should each ultimately seek when we come to Christ.

Love Me Where You're At

By Francis Frangipane
(En Español)

I have discovered that, as we seek the Lord, our most difficult periods can be transformed into wonderful breakthroughs into God's love. For me one such season occurred during the years 1979 to1981. The association of churches with which I was aligned had fallen under spiritual deception. Not only were its core doctrines increasingly seeded with New Age influences, but also immorality crept in, and key leaders began leaving their wives for other women. I could no longer remain silent. As a result, in 1979 I left my congregation in Detroit, Michigan, where I had served as pastor, and traveled to the organization's regional headquarters in Iowa. I came to plead for repentance. However, after meeting with the senior leaders, I was asked to leave the group.

An Israelite Indeed

By Francis Frangipane
(En Español)

Consider the conversation Jesus had with Nathanael. He said, "Behold, an Israelite indeed, in whom is no deceit!" (John 1:47). What kind of man was this young disciple, that Jesus should praise him? There was no guile, no deceit in this young man's heart. Oh, how we should desire this purity for ourselves! Nathanael had "eyes . . . within." (Rev. 4:8). He kept himself free from self-deception. When you cleave to the truth inwardly, you will perceive the truth outwardly. Nathanael looked at Jesus and declared, "You are the Son of God; You are the King of Israel" (v. 49).

Jesus said to Nathanael, "You will see greater things than these. . . . I say to you, you will see the heavens opened and the angels of God ascending and descending on the Son of Man" (vv. 50-51).

Purity of Heart: Open Vision

By Francis Frangipane
(En Español)

Spiritual perception is based upon purity of heart. What we see in life and how we see it is rooted in the soil of our inner thought life. If we would experience clear and open vision concerning the kingdom of God, a pure heart is most essential.

Revelation Perception at the Throne of God
In the book of Revelation there is a marvel: ". . . in the center and around the throne, four living creatures full of eyes in front and behind . . . around and within" (Rev. 4:6, 8). Our purpose here is not to spend ourselves in speculations about these creatures. Our goal is to possess that purity of heart that comes from living in the awareness of God. We're seeking the open vision that is manifested at His throne.

Forgiveness and the Future of Your City

By Francis Frangipane
(En Español)

When I look at the conditions of our world -- the deep racial and political divisions, immigration problems, terror threats, national debt, wars, and lawlessness in our cities -- a deep foreboding comes over my soul. As Christians, we all believe the call of 2 Chronicles 7:14 offers hope, but what if there is no response to the call to humble ourselves and pray? Is there anything we can do to restore hope and stability?

There is a situation mentioned in the Bible that offers a solution. Nebuchadnezzar, king of Babylon, "and all his army, with all the kingdoms of the earth that were under his dominion and all the peoples, were fighting against Jerusalem" (Jer. 34:1). Because of Israel’s sin even the Lord had seemingly withdrawn. For nearly forty years, Jeremiah pleaded with God’s people to repent, but they would not. Israel was nearly apostate, and the dire and repeated warnings of Jeremiah were about to come to pass.

A Place for Him to Rest, Part 3

By Francis Frangipane
(En Español)

Cease Striving, Know, Then Obey
To enter God's rest requires we abide in full surrender to His will, in perfect trust of His power. We learn to rest from our works "as God did from His" (Heb. 4:10). To "rest from our labors" does not mean we have stopped working; it means we have stopped the laborious work of the flesh and sin. It means we have entered the eternal works that He brings forth through us.

The turmoil caused by unbelief is brought to rest by faith. The strife rooted in unforgiveness is removed by love. Our fearful thoughts, He arrests through trust; our many questions are answered by His wisdom. Such is the mind that has entered the rest of God.

A Place for Him to Rest, Part 2

By Francis Frangipane
(En Español)

Enveloped and Permeated with God
The Hebrew word for rest is nuach; among other things, it means "to rest, remain, be quiet." It also indicates a "complete envelopment and thus permeation," as in the spirit of Elijah "resting" on Elisha, or when wisdom "rests in the heart of him who has understanding." God is not looking for a place where He can merely cease from His labors with men. He seeks a relationship where He can "completely envelop and thus permeate" every dimension of our lives, where He can tabernacle, remain, and be quiet within us.

A Place for Him to Rest, Part 1

By Francis Frangipane
(En Español)

In the kingdom, there are no great men of God, just humble men whom God has chosen to use greatly. How do we know when we are humble? When God speaks, we tremble. God is looking for a man who trembles at His words. Such a man will find the Spirit of God resting upon him; he will become a dwelling place for the Almighty. 

Entering the Sabbath Rest of God
"Heaven is My throne and the earth is My footstool. Where then is a house you could build for Me? And where is a place that I may rest?" ---Isaiah 66:1

The Real Jesus

By Francis Frangipane
(En Español)

A Storm, a Ghost or Jesus?
Get used to the idea that among all the blessings you have received from God, the real Jesus is also the “author and perfecter of [our] faith” (Heb. 12:2). In that regard, sooner or later the Lord will require you to look straight in the eye of the impossible and believe God for His power.

Consider the occasion when Jesus sent His disciples ahead of Him to the other side of the Sea of Galilee. Later that night, Jesus comes to them walking on water (see Matt. 14:22-33). Contrary winds are churning the sea with turbulent swells. Of course, Jesus could have waited for a calm day to walk on water. Or He simply could have arrived at the other side of the sea supernaturally. No, the Lord comes to the disciples with something in mind; He comes to them as the perfecter of their faith.

Breaking the Power of Disappointment

By Francis Frangipane
(En Español)

The Enemy's Work
One may argue, "But I know people who were good Christians who have fallen away." Yes, but in most cases you will find that prior to falling away they fell into deep disappointment about a failed spiritual expectation. Disappointment is not just a sad emotional state of mind; deep disappointment actually can sever our hearts from faith. It can "dis-appoint" us from our appointed destiny.

I have known many who were doing well, moving toward their destiny. The future God had for them seemed close enough to taste. Then they became disappointed in someone or something. By accepting a demonically manipulated dis-appointment into their spirits, and letting that event germinate and grow into a disappointment with God, a bitter cold winter overtook their souls and their destiny went dormant.

At the Appointed Time

By Francis Frangipane
(En Español)

 In spite of escalating turmoil in our world, there still remains one last, great outpouring of mercy before the time of the end (see Matt. 24:14; Acts 2:17). This supernatural season is not something for which we must beg God. No, its coming has been predetermined. It is the "appointed time" of the Lord.

As most know, an "appointed time" is an open display of the sovereignty and power of God, whether it is in calling a person or calling a nation. In it we discover with absolute certainty that nothing is impossible for God. It is a season when God fulfills the hopes and dreams of His people.

Repentance and the Way God Calls Holy

By Francis Frangipane
(En Español)

Many are calling for prayer for our nation. To that message I would like to add a call to repentance as well. Indeed, 2 Chronicles 7:14 not only calls us to pray but to follow through by humbling ourselves and aggressively turning away from evil. In that spirit, we then seek God's face. There is far too much compromise among us. We need a breakthrough into brokenness. A move of God is coming, but it will only be as deep as our repentance prepares us.

The purpose of this message is to take us beyond simply feeling sorry we sinned. God wants to bring us into an attitude of repentance that goes deep, that persistently turns to God's grace until the fruit of righteousness comes forth in our lives.

The Stronghold of Christ's Likeness

By Francis Frangipane
(En Español)

God's Highest Purpose
Most Christians only engage in spiritual warfare with a hope of either relieving present distresses or attaining a "normal" existence. However, the purpose of all aspects of spirituality, warfare included, is to bring us into the image of Christ. Nothing -- not worship or warfare, neither love nor deliverance -- is truly attainable if we miss the singular objective of our faith: Christlikeness.

Let us recall that when the Lord delivered the ancient Hebrews out of Egypt it was so He could bring them into the Promised Land. Likewise, we are delivered out of sin, not that we might live for ourselves, but so we might come into Christlikeness. What we call "salvation" is the first phase of being conformed to Christ. If we fail to see this we easily become entangled in the same sins that oppressed us in the first place.

Door of Hope

By Francis Frangipane
(En Español)

We tend to boast in the power of faith while minimizing the value of hope. Yet "faith is the substance of the things hoped for" (Heb. 11:1 KJV). Without first having a living hope in God, our faith is meaningless. Indeed, the first stage of transformation is the awakening of hope.

Yet, even after we come to Christ, we still fail. Often a downward spiral occurs when sin opens the door to condemnation, and condemnation smothers the voice of hope. Consider the story of Israel’s conquest of Canaan. The Lord was about to prosper Israel with the wealth of the Canaanites, but only if the spoils of their first battle at Jericho were completely dedicated to God. However, one man, Achan, defied the Lord's edict. He took silver, gold, and a garment from Shinar, and then he hid the spoils in his tent. As a result of his sin, thirty-six Israelites died in their next battle -- defeated and humiliated by the tiny city of Ai.

Standing Behind Our Wall

By Francis Frangipane
(En Español)

The sense of distance we often feel between Christ and ourselves is an illusion. As we enter the days prior to Christ's Second Coming, the Lord shall begin to remove that falsehood. Indeed, He promises, "In that day you will know that I am in My Father, and you in Me, and I in you" (John 14:20).

Scripture tells us that Christ is the vine; we are the branches. He is the head; we are His body; He is the Lord, and we are His temple. From start to finish, the Bible declares the Lord not only has a dwelling in Heaven, but that He also abides perpetually in redemptive union with His people. The ever-present focus of His activity is to guide us into oneness with Himself.