The Song of Moses and of the Lamb

By Francis Frangipane
(En Español)

Within the boundaries of the physical universe there is perhaps nothing so accessible to the spiritual realms as music. It is a bridge media, capable of transporting the human soul through the invisible gateways of time and space. Indeed, who among us has not heard the words of an old but special song without suddenly finding our hearts flooded by the sadness or joy of a past event? Or who hasn't listened to Beethoven's "Ode to Joy" or Handel's "Messiah," and had their soul lifted on the wings of music upward into the very threshold of Heaven.

Conversely, it was the music of the 1960s that, like the Trojan horse, smuggled into Western culture a diabolical and hidden army: we sang, while demons of rebellion, sorcery, drug abuse and illicit sex covertly slipped into our thought-life and laid siege upon our moral standards. Today, this sinister music has secured such a major grip upon the West that major rock musicians brazenly embrace the worship of Satan himself, filling stadiums with young people intoxicated by the music of hell.

To Touch the Heart of God

By Francis Frangipane
(En Español)

There are three basic categories of Christians. The largest group consists of people who, though they try to avoid the darkness in the world, have no hope that the world can be redeemed. Assuming Christ's return is imminent, they retreat into what seems a shelter of apathy concerning the non-Christian world around them. Yet most are not truly apathetic. Their souls, like Lot's, are vexed by the conduct of unprincipled men (2 Pet. 2:7-8). Their compassion, though, is kindled even if it's limited. Rarely do they extend themselves beyond the needs of their immediate family and closest friends. They love the Lord, but they don't know how or what to do to change society or even to positively impact their neighborhoods.