Mercy Not Wrath

By Francis Frangipane

The church is created not to fulfill God's wrath, but to complete His mercy. Remember, we are called to be a "house of prayer for all…nations." Consider passionately this phrase: "prayer for." Jesus taught His disciples to "pray for" those who would persecute or mistreat them (Matt.5 44). When Job "prayed for" his friends, God fully restored him (Job 42:10). We are to "pray for the peace of Jerusalem" (Ps. 122:6), and "pray for" each other so that we may be healed (James 5:16).

According to the Word of God, the Lord "desires all men to be saved" (1 Tim. 2:4). Therefore, Paul urged "that entreaties and prayers…be made on behalf of all men, for kings and all who are in authority" (vv. 1-2). You see, the call is to pray for people.

Not Judgmental, But Prayer-mental

By Francis Frangipane

God does not want us to be judgmental; He wants us prayer-mental. As instinctively as we might have judged people, we should pray for them instead. Today, countless Christians are angry with their elected officials. We say our anger is "righteous indignation." Yet, if our goal is to truly obtain the heart of Christ, we must remember: Jesus forgave those who crucified Him. Consider Peter's personal experience. Remember, Peter actually lived with Jesus. He walked and talked with Christ, he had his meals with Jesus. He watched how Jesus never reacted. He described the Lord as a man who, "while being reviled, He did not revile in return; while suffering, He uttered no threats." How did Jesus keep Himself from anger, carnal reactions and bitterness? Peter says that Jesus "kept entrusting Himself to Him who judges righteously." (1 Peter 2:23). I love that description: Jesus entrusted Himself to God the Judge of all. He will Judge.

Army of Worshipers

By Francis Frangipane

We were created for God's pleasure. We were not created to live for ourselves but for Him. And while the Lord desires that we enjoy His gifts and His people, He would have us know we were created first for His pleasure. In the closing moments of this age, the Lord will have a people whose purpose for living is to please God. In them, God finds His own reward for creating man. They are His worshipers. They are on earth only to please God, and when He is pleased, they also are pleased.

When Becoming Nothing is an Improvement

By Francis Frangipane

In the beginning, the earth was formless and void, but that did not deter the Almighty. He looked into the fathomless depth of its darkness and concluded, "All it needs is light!" Likewise, in the beginning of our spiritual lives, we also are "formless and void" and God, just as confidently, is still saying, "All they need is a little light!" Remember: it's the Lord's responsibility to create and our responsibility to submit to His creating.

The Lord only needs three things to fashion life. First, He needs a "nothing." The Almighty always begins His great, creative works with a "nothing" (this is very important because this is where we come in.) Then, His Spirit needs to be hovering over the "nothing." And, finally, He needs His Word, which is the "something" He's going to put in the "nothing's" place.

To This One Will I Look

By Francis Frangipane

Transcendent, Liberating Humility
Of all virtues, Jesus elevated meekness above the others. Why? Humility is the door opener to grace: no virtue enters our lives except that humility bids it come. Without humility, we have no sense or attachment to our personal need; we see no reason to change or appropriate future grace.

Yet, humility is not only host to the other virtues, it is also the life essence that sustains them. It is humility that recognizes when love is growing cold and humility that confesses our need for greater faith. Without humility, our virtues harden into lifeless statues within the sanctuary of our hearts. Thus, humility sustains the unfolding of true spiritual nobility. It provides increasing wholeness, life and growth to all other virtues.